Ep-PAINE-nym



Heberden’s Nodes

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

 

Definitionosteophytic growths on the distal interphalangeal joints of the fingers and toes

 

Heberden-Arthrose.JPG

 

Clinical SignificanceMost commonly seen in osteoarthritis and similar to, but much more common than, Bouchard’s nodes of the proximal interphalangeal joints.  They are much more common in women and seem to have a genetic predisposition.

 

History – Named after William Heberden (1710-1801), who was an English physician and received his medical doctorate from St. Johns College in Cambridge in 1739, where he made his name a distinguished medical lecturer at the university.  He received fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians in 1746 and then the Royal Society in 1749.  He njoyed a prolific medical practice in London and Paris for over 30 years.  While semi-retired, he worked on a collection of papers for the Royal College of Physicians to be transcribed into a three volume textbook entitled Medical Transactions.  These were eventually revised and transcribed in English, by his son William Heberden the younger, which included a chapter on arthritis by Heberden the elder describing these findings.

 

William Heberden b1710.jpg

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. https://archive.org/details/2556044R.nlm.nih.gov

Ep-PAINE-nym



Duke Criteria

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

 

Definitionradiographic, laboratory, pathologic, and clinical criteria to help establish the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and (similar to the Jones Criteria) there are major and minor subtypes:

  • Major
    • Two positive blood cultures (drawn 12 hours apart) with typical endocarditis pathogen
      • Viridans-group streptococci
      • Streptococcus bovis
      • HACEK group
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Community-acquired enterococci
      • Coxiella burnetii
    • Evidence of endocardial involvement with positive echocardiogram showing:
      • oscillating intracardiac mass
      • Abscess
      • partial dehiscence of prosthetic valve or new valvular regurgitation
  • Minor
    • known cardiac lesion or IVDU
    • Fever > 38°C
    • Evidence of septic emboli
    • Immunologic phenomenon: glomerulonephritis, Osler’s nodes, Janeway lesions, conjunctival hemorrhage
    • Positive blood culture  or laboratory evidence of organisms not described above

 

Clinical Significancea diagnosis of infective endocarditis is made with 1 major and 1 minor, or 3 minor criteria

 

History – Named after the Duke Endocarditis Service, which established these criteria with their seminal paper entitled “New Criteria for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis” in 1994.  The group sought to improve upon the older von Reyn criteria and increase the specificity, so as to not miss cases and have potentially catastrophic cardiac complications later.  These criteria were further validated several times throughout the 1990s and modified in 2000, which is the current set we use today.

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Durack DT, Lukes AS, Bright DK. New criteria for diagnosis of infective endocarditis: utilization of specific echocardiographic findings. Duke Endocarditis Service. Am J Med. 1994; 96(3):200-9. [pubmed]
  7. Li JS, Sexton DJ, Mick N, et al. Proposed modifications to the Duke criteria for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2000; 30(4):633-8. [pubmed]

Life and Whatnot

I wanted to send a little post out for those that subscribe to the blog, but also for anyone that is following me on social media.  One of the core tenets of a successful online presence is consistency and predictability.  I have prided myself on producing content fairly regularly over the past year and I will continue to do this…….once I get this thing called life settled out.

 

As you all know, I started my new position as program director at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center PA Program in January and have been commuting home to Birmingham every weekend for the past 4 months.  I usually have some time worked into the weekends to schedule some of the content (Motivation Mondays, Wednesdays Ep-PAINE-nyms, Saturdays PAINE PANCE Pearls) in advance so it gets outs even if I get busy.

 

We finally closed on both our houses (Birmingham and Memphis) in the last 2 weeks and we are finally getting one step closer to be a one zip code family.  My amazing wife is still living in Birmingham for the next 2.5 weeks to get the kids finished in school Alabama, but this entails living in hotels or her mother’s house.  Every extra moment of time I have now is devoted to painting and assembling furniture in the new house so it is ready to go when the family arrives at the end of the May.

 

 

I will be back in full swing on June 1st.  Again….my apologies for the lack of content for the past few weeks, but we will be up and running again soon.