Ep-PAINE-nym



Traube’s Space

Other Known Aliases none

Definition crescent-shaped, anatomic space of the LUQ bordered by the lower edge of the lung, anterior border of the spleen, left costal margin, and the inferior margin of the left lobe of the liver

Clinical Significance Clinically, the surface borders are the sixth rib superiorly, the left mid-axillary line laterally, and the left costal margin inferiorly. The importance of this space is during percussion for splenomegaly. If the spleen is not enlarged, then there will be resonance to percussion. If splenomegaly is present, then there will be dullness. False positives include recent meals, fundal mass, left pleural effusions, or pericardial effusion.

HistoryNamed after Ludwig Traube (1818-1876), a German physician who received his medical doctorate from the University of Berlin in 1840. Due to prejudice against his Jewish ancestry, his academic career was handicapped despite working with notable physicians in Germany and publishing on ground breaking experimental physiology studies, which included using temperature measurement as a routine clinical examination method. A master in auscultation and percussion, he was sought after throughout Germany to study under and utilized these techniques in his popular patient clinics. It was here that one of his former students, Oscar Fraentzel, observed the master clinician and published a report in 1868 on this eponymous space, which he named after his mentor.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. O. Fraentzel. Bemerkungen über den halbmondförmigen Raum und über den Vocalfremitus. Berliner klinische Wochenschrift, 1868, 5: 509-511 [link]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Other Known Aliases autoimmune thyroiditis

Definition – autoimmune destruction of the thyroid gland

Clinical Significance the gradual destruction of the thyroid gland will initially cause hyperthyroid symptoms, before progressing back to euthyroid, and eventually hypothyroid symptoms. As a result, the diagnosis can be tricky depending on where in the disease spectrum the patient is in. Overall, this is the most common cause/form of hypothryoidism and the most common autoantibodies are against thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and TSH receptors.

HistoryNamed after Hakaru Hashimoto (1881-1934), a Japanese surgeon and general practioner, who received his medical doctorate from Fukuoka Medical College in 1907. He would study surgery under the direction of Hayari Miyake, Japan’s first neurosurgeon, and would publish his thesis findings on lymphomatous changes of excised thyroids in 1912, which would become the basis of his eponymous disease. He would frequently visit his patients in their homes, traveling almost exclusively by rickshaw, and was known not to charge his poorer patients any fees for his services.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Hashimoto H. Zur Kenntnis der lymphomatösen Veränderung der Schilddrüse (Struma lymphomatosa). Archiv für klinische Chirurgie. 1912;97:219-248.

Ep-PAINE-nym



Bonney Test

Other Known Aliases none

Definition – bedside test with urinary incontinence to determine if it is due to anatomical or structural issues

Clinical Significance After a positive stress incontinence test, Bonney test is performed, where either a specialized instrument or examiner’s fingers are placed laterally to the urethral opening and pushed up to elevate the neck of the bladder. The patient then coughs to see if urine still escapes. If no urine leaks, then the incontinence is due the descent of the bladder neck into the vagina. If urine still escapes, it is due to weakness in the sphincter.

HistoryNamed after William Francis Victor Bonney (1872-1953), a British gynecologist who received his medical doctorate from Chelsea Hospital for Women in 1896. He would go on to achieve Master of Surgery distinction in 1899 and was accepted as a fellow in the Royal College of Surgeons and Physicians in 1900. He would spend his entire career developing, pioneering, and mastering operative techniques in gynecologic surgery towards more conservative approaches to reduce mortality, morbidity, and disability associated with the more conventional approaches of the time. This was largely due to his wife, Annie, receiving a total hysterectomy early in their marriage for anemia associated with her heavy cycles. He also developed his own antiseptic solution called “Bonney’s Blue” used during vaginal surgeries which profoundly reduced infectious mortality. He would author more than 200 manuscripts during his career culminating his Textbook of Gynaecologic Surgery that is still in print today. He is regarded as one of, if not the, major influencer in modern gynecologic surgery.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Bonney, William Francis Victor (1872–1953). In: Baskett TF. Eponyms and Names in Obstetrics and Gynaecology . Cambridge University Press; 2019. [book]
  7. Powell, John L. MD, FACOG, FACS Powell’s Pearls, Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey: June 2005 – Volume 60 – Issue 6 – p 337-340 doi: 10.1097/01.ogx.0000162245.13467.5d

Ep-PAINE-nym



Behçet’s Disease

Other Known Aliases Silk Road Disease

Definition – systemic inflammatory disorder that commonly effects the eyes, mouth, GI/GU tract, nervous system, and blood vessels

Clinical Significance Pathogenesis is largely unknown, but theorized to have a genetic predisposition. It is rare in the United States and more common in the Middle East and Asia, where it received is other eponym as the “silk road disease” due to the trading routes going through Turkey and the Mediterranean. Onset of the disease in most commonly in 20’s-40’s and is more common in men than women. Treatment is most commonly antiinflammatories and immunosuppressants.

HistoryNamed after Hulusi Behçet (1889-1948), a Turkish dermatologist who received his medical doctorate from the Gülhane Military Medical Academy in Istanbul in 1910. He served as staff physician at the Edirne Military Hospital during World War I and took a special interest in venereal diseases and dermatology. He would go on to become professor in the newly formed republic of Turkey and was the first person in Turkish academia to receive this rank. He took a special interest in the manifestations of syphilis and published extensively on this condition. He described is eponymous condition in 1936 after following several patients with similar symptoms and presenting them at meeting in Paris. It should be noted that several others had described this condition, as early as 1922, but Behçet was the first to recommend it as a previously undiscovered disease process.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. H. Behçet. Über rezidivierende, aphtöse, durch ein Virus verursachte Geschwüre am Mund, am Auge und an den Genitalien. Dermatologische Wochenschrift, Hamburg, 1937, 105(36): 1152-1163.