Ep-PAINE-nym



Lisfranc Injury

 

Other Known AliasesTarsometatarsal fracture/dislocation

DefinitionFracture/dislocation of the articulation of the tarsal bones with the metatarsals of the foot.

Clinical Significance The Lisfranc joint of the foot is where the first three metatarsals articulate with the three cuneiforms and the fourth and fifth metatarsals articulate with the cuboid. The Lisfranc ligament attaches the medial cuneiform to the 2nd metatarsal bone on the the plantar surface of the foot.  This is a very serious injury of the foot and sometimes may simple present as a bad sprain.  This injury is most common seen with direct crush injuries and indirect load onto a plantar flexed foot.

Image result for lisfranc jointRelated imageImage result for lisfranc ligament

History – This injury was first described by Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon who served in Napoleon’s army in 1813.  He noted this injury pattern in Calvary soldiers who fell from their horse and caught their foot in the stirrup. 

 

Image result for jacques lisfranc


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Welck MJ, Zinchenko R, Rudge B. Lisfranc injuries. Injury. 2015; 46(4):536-41. [pubmed]
  6. Chaney DM. The Lisfranc joint. Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery. 2010; 27(4):547-60. [pubmed]

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