Ep-PAINE-nym



Littre’s Hernia

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

DefinitionHernia involving a Meckel’s diverticulum 

Clinical SignificanceNo real clinical significance other than it is an extremely rare type of hernia, but is always included in the typical pimping barrage of surgery students.  It should also be included in the “zebras” of differential diagnoses of RLQ pain.

Image result for littre's herniaImage result for littre's hernia

History – Named after Alexis Littrè (1654-1726), who was a distinguished physician and prolific surgeon at the historic Salpêtriére Teaching Hospital in Paris.  He was inducted into the famed Académie des Sciences in part to his ridiculous dissection of over 200 cadavers in 1684.  He first described an femoral hernia involving an intestinal diverticulum in 1700 in one of his cadaver dissections.

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Skandalakis PN, Zoras O, Skandalakis JE, Mirilas P. Littre hernia: surgical anatomy, embryology, and technique of repair. The American surgeon. 2006; 72(3):238-43. [pubmed]
  6. Sturdy DJ.  Science and Social Status: The Members of the Academie Des Sciences 1666-1750. 1995.  Boydell Press
  7. Malling B, Karlsen AA, Hern J.  Littre Hernia: A rare case of incacerated Meckel’s diverticulum.  Ultrasound Int Open.  2017;3(2):E91-92.

Ep-PAINE-nym



Meckel’s Diverticulum

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

DefinitionVestigial remnant of the omphalomesenteric duct 

Clinical SignificanceIt is the most common malformation in the GI tract and is mainly asymptomatic.  When symptoms do occur, it commonly presents as painless, rectal bleeding in children.  The “Rule of 2s” will help you remember the facts of this pathology:

  • Effects 2% of the population
  • 2% of these will be symptomatic by age 2
  • 2 types of heterotopic tissue
  • Boy-to-girl ratio is 2:1
  • Usually 2″ in length
  • 2′ from the ileocecal valve

Image result for meckel's diverticulumImage result for meckel's diverticulum

History – Named after Johann Friedrich Meckel, the Younger (1781-1833), who was born into a prestigious medical family, with his father and grandfather already prolific physicians and professors of medicine in Halle, Prussia.  He made tremendous advancements in the area of anatomy and embryonic development with special attention to birth defects and abnormalities, where he pioneered the early study of teratology.  He first described the abnormality which bears his name in 1809.

Johann Friedrich Meckel.jpg


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Stallion A, Shuck JM.  Meckel’s Diverticulum.  Surgical Treatment: Evidence-Based and Problem-Oriented.  2001 [pubmed]
  6. Blackbourne LH.  Surgical Recall.  6th ed. 2012
  7. J. F. Meckel. Über die Divertikel am Darmkanal. Archiv für die Physiologie, Halle, 1809, 9: 421–453
  8. Klunker R, Göbbel L, Musil A, Tönnies H, Schultka R. Johann Friedrich Meckel the Younger (1781-1833) and modern teratology. Annals of Anatomy. 2002; 184(6):535-40. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Grave’s Disease

 

Other Known AliasesAutoimmune hyperthyroidism

Definition – Hyperthyrodism caused by antibodies that stimulate T3/T4 secretion.  The most common antibodies are thyroid-secreting hormone (TSH) and thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb). 

Clinical SignificanceClassic clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism include thyromegaly, ophthalmaopathy, resting tremor, palpitations, weight loss, heat intolerance.  For more in depth analysis of hyperthyroidism, see my 2017 talk at ASPA here.

History – Named after Robert James Graves (1796-1853), who was an prolific Irish physician, surgeon, and educator.  He was named Regius professor of the Institute of Medicine in Trinity College, founded the Dublin Journal of Medical and Chemical Sciences, and was a an early adopter of clinical bedside rounding and teaching with medical students. Dr. Graves wrote a routine clinical lecture series in the London Medical and Surgical Journal and first described a young female patient with ophthalmopathy and goiter in 1835.  Dr. Armand Trousseau then published the collection of these articles in 1864 entitled “Clinical Lectures on the Practice of Medicine” and gave him this eponym.  Another contribution of Dr. Graves was the creation of the second hand on watches to time pulses and the practice of providing food and water with patients with a fever, instead of the common practice of withholding nourishment.

Image result for robert james graves

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Graves RJ.  Newly Observed Affection of the Thyroid Gland. London Medical and Surgical Journal.  1835. Vol.7. Part 2. 512
  6. Graves RJ, Trousseau A.  Clinical Lectures on the Practice of Medicine.  1864.  Dublin.
  7. Smith TJ, Hegedüs L. Graves’ Disease. The New England journal of medicine. 2016; 375(16):1552-1565. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Addison’s Disease

 

Other Known Aliasesprimary adrenal insufficiency

Definitionautoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex that produces cortisol

Clinical SignificanceIn times of physiologic stress, the adrenal glands are unable to produce and secrete cortisol, which is a key hormone in the “fight-or-flight” response.  If the stress is significant (trauma, surgery, hemorrhage, etc.), then the patient can not mount a compensatory response to this stress and can have life-threatening consequences

History – Named after Thomas Addison (1795-1860), an English physician, who first wrote about the condition in a short note in the London Medical Gazette called “Anaemia – Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules”.  This was then followed up by the more well known article “On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsule” in 1855, which is largely considered the beginning of the study of the adrenal glands.  The disease eponym was original given to Dr. Addison by the French physician, Armand Trousseau, after fierce debate among experts as to whether the disease actually existed.

Image result for thomas addison

Image result for on the constitution and local effects of disease of the suprarenal capsules

https://library.sydney.edu.au/collections/rare-books/online-exhibitions/medicine/AddisonConstitutional1855plate8.jpg


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Addison T.  On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules.  1855.  London: Samuel Highley.

Ep-PAINE-nym



Bowman’s Capsule

 

Other Known AliasesCapsula glomeruli, glomerular capsule

DefinitionDouble walled, cup-like capsule surrounding the glomerulus

Image result for bowman's capsule

Clinical SignificanceIt is made up of two poles: a vascular pole (afferent and efferent arterioles) and a urinary pole (proximal convoluted tubule). Within the capsule, there is a parietal layer and visceral layer with a space in between.  This is where ultrafiltration takes place and urine is filtered from the blood.

History – Named after Sir William Bowman (1816-1892), who was an English ophthalmologist, histologist, and anatomist, and first identified this structure in 1841.  He published his findings at the age of 25 and was awarded The Royal Medal by the Royal Society of  London.

He was well known for his extensive use microscopes in visualizing structures of the human body and publishing two works with his mentor, Robert Bentley Todd, entitled “Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man” and “Cyclopaedia of Anatomy and Physiology”.

William Bowman.jpg

The Cyclopaedia Of Anatomy And Physiology


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Bowman W.  On the Structure and Use of the Malpighian Bodies of the Kidney.  Phil Trans R Soc Lond.  1842;132:57-80
  6. Eknoyan G. Sir William Bowman: his contributions to physiology and nephrology. Kidney international. 1996; 50(6):2120-8. [pubmed]
  7. Galst JM. Sir William Bowman (1816-1892). Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960). 2007; 125(4):459. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Gerota’s Fascia

 

Other Known AliasesRenal fascia

DefinitionConnective tissue layers covering the kidneys and adrenal glands

Clinical Significance This connective tissue encapsulates these organs and must be excised to perform nephrectomies and adrenalectomies.  It has 4 attachments:

  • Anterior attachment – Connects the anterior layer of the renal fascia of the opposite kidney.
  • Posterior attachment – Connects the psoas fascia and the body of the vertebrae.
  • Superior attachment – The anterior and posterior layers fuse at the upper pole of the kidney and then split to enclose the adrenal gland. At the upper part of the adrenal gland they again fuse to form the suspensory ligament of the adrenal gland and fuse with the diaphragmatic fascia.
  • Inferior attachment – The posterior layer descends downwards and fuses with the iliac fascia. The anterior layer blends with the connective tissue of the iliac fossa.

History – Named after Dimitrie D. Gerota (1867-1939), who was a Romanian physician and professor of surgical anatomy and experimental surgery at the University of Bucharest.  He was also the first radiologist in Romania and developed a method for injecting lymphatic vessels known as “The Gerota Method”

13-foto1

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com

Ep-PAINE-nym



Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

 

Other Known AliasesLupus

DefinitionAutoimmune disease that can effect the entire system…most commonly skin, joints, and constitutional.

Clinical Significance For this eponym, there is no clinical significance.  Just a cool fact I wanted to bring up….

History – You may have been wondering (or maybe not) where the “lupus” part of this disease comes from.  Having studied Latin in high school all four years, this perplexed me in PA school because “lupus” is Greek for wolf.  So why did early physicians decide on throwing “wolf” into the disease title?

Well (since you asked), it has been attributed to the 13th century Rogerius (who practiced with his friend, Stevius) who thought the characteristic erosive, dermatologic skin findings were similar to the effects of a wolf bite.

 

For those fellow PotterHeads out there, now you know the foreshadowing of (my favorite character) Remus LUPIN in the series.

Image result for lupin potter


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Blotzer JW. Systemic lupus erythematosus I: historical aspects. Maryland State Medical Journal. 1983; 32(6):439-41. [pubmed]
  6. Bertino LS, Lu LC. The bite of a wolf: systemic lupus erythematosus. Rehabilitation nursing : the official journal of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses. 1993; 18(3):173-8. [pubmed]