Ep-PAINE-nym



Monteggia Fracture

Other Known Aliasesnone

Definitionproximal 1/3 ulnar fracture with radial head dislocation

Clinical Significance This type of injury pattern is most commonly seen with FOOSH injuries and is more common in children than adults with a peak incidence of 4-10 years of age. There are four different classifications depending on the injury pattern. There is also high incidence of neurovascular compromise and a good bedside exam is paramount prior to surgical repair.

HistoryNamed after Giovanni Battista Monteggia (1762-1815), who was an Italian surgeon and received his medical doctorate from the University of Pavia in 1789 at the age of seventeen. He would begin his career as a surgery apprentice at the Great Hospital in Milano in 1790 culminating in professor of anatomy and surgery in 1795. His knowledge of anatomy and skill as a surgeon impressed his a very famous colleague at the University of Pavia, one Antonio Scarpa. He published his eponymous injury in 1814 in his textbook entitled “Institziono Chirurgiche”. Of note, the first radiograph was not taken until 1895.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Orthobullets. Monteggia Fractures. https://www.orthobullets.com/trauma/1024/monteggia-fractures
  7. Monteggia GB. Instituzioni Chirurgiches. Vol. 5. Maspero; Milan, Italy: 1814.

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