Ep-PAINE-nym



Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

 

Definition – Type of lymphoma predominantly from lymphocytes that arise from germinal center or post-germinal center of B cells

 

Clinical SignificanceAccounts for 10% of all lymphomas and 0.6% of all cancers.  It is also associated with a bimodal age distribution of young adults (20s) and older adults (60s), with a slight male predominance.  Epstein-Barr virus is the most common causative agent and it carries a favorable prognosis.

 

History – Named after Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866), who was British physician and considered one of the most prominent pathologists of his time.  He was also a perpetual student constantly learning new techniques including being an early adopter of the stethoscope anda fervent advocate for preventative medicine.  He first described his findings on his eponymous disease in 1832, but it wasn’t until 33 years later when another British physician, Samuel Wilks, “re-discovered” the disease and Hodgkin’s work did it gain any traction and recognition.

 

Thomas Hodgkin photo.jpg

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Hodgkin Lymphome.  British Medical Journal – Best Practice. http://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-us/311
  6. Hodgkin T.  On Some Morbid Appearances of The Absorbent Glands and Spleen.  Med Chir Trans.  1832;17:68-114.

PAINE #PANCE Pearl – Oncology



27yo male, with stage II Hodgkin’s lymphoma, presents to his oncologists’s office for 6-week follow-up s/p 4 cycles of ABVD chemotherapy.  He reports malaise and fatigue, but is otherwise in good spirits.  Vitals show:

  • BP – 122/72 mmHg
  • HR – 96 bpm
  • RR – 15 bpm
  • O2% – 100% on room air
  • Temperature – 38.5oC (101.4oF)

 

Labs in the office are below:

 

Ep-PAINE-nym



Auer Rods

 

Other Known Aliasesnone

 

Definition – Auer rods are azurophilic granules found in the cytoplasm of leukemic blast cells and are composed of fused lyosomes.

 

Image result for auer rods

 

Clinical SignificanceThese are found in high grade myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes and are pathognomonic for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

 

Image result for auer rods

 

History – Named after John Auer (1875-1948), an American physiologist and pharmacologist, who held appointments at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, and the St. Louis School of Medicine. He first described these structures in a 21yo male who was suffering from a sore throat and nosebleed and admitted to Sir William Osler’s service for work-up.  He published this finding in 1906, but were first described by a colleague of his at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Thomas McCrae.  Interestingly, they both erroneously thought that the cells containing these structures were lymphoblasts, not myeloblasts.

 

Image result for john auer rods

scanned image of page 404


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Gordon SW, Krystal GW. Auer Rods. NEJM. 2017; 376(21):2065. [pubmed]
  6. Auer J. Some hitherto Undescribed Structures Found in the Large Lymphocytes of a Case of Acute Leukemia. AJMS. 1906;131(6):1002-1014 [article]
  7. McCrae T. Acute Lymphatic Leukemia, with Report of Five Cases. BMJ. 1905; 1(2304):404-8. [pubmed]
  8. John Auer. http://www.iqb.es/historiamedicina/personas/auer.htm

Ep-PAINE-nym



von Willebrand Disease

 

Other Known Aliaseshereditary pseudohemophilia

DefinitionAutosomal dominant, hereditary clotting disorder arising from a deficiency in the quantity and/or quality of von Willebrand factor (vWF), which is a protein required for protein adhesion and involved in primary hemostasis.  The genetic defect responsible for vWF production the vWF gene located on the short arm p of chromosome 12 (12p13.2).

Image result for von willebrand factor

 

Clinical SignificanceThis is the most common type of hereditary blood-clotting disorder in humans, with 3 main hereditary types and multiple subtypes.  Type 1 is the most common and often asymptomatic, Type 2 can have mild to moderate symptoms, Type 3 is the most severe and can manifest with hemarthosis and internal bleeding. 

History – Named after Erik Adolf von Willebrand (1870-1949), a Finnish physician graduating from the University of Helsinki 1896, and who took a special interest in hematology and coagulation.  In 1924, a 5yo girl was brought to him due to a bleeding disorder and he successfully performed a family history map on the girl’s 66 living family members and discovered the autosomal dominant pattern.  He published his findings in 1926 in Swedish calling it “pseudo-hemophilia”, but it wasn’t until 1931 (when it was translated into German) did it gain any traction in the medical community.

 

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Von Willebrand EA. Hereditary pseudohaemophilia. Haemophilia. 1999; 5(3):223-31. [translation of original paper] [pubmed]
  6. Leebeek FW, Eikenboom JC. Von Willebrand’s Disease. NEJM. 2016; 375(21):2067-2080. [pubmed]
  7. Nilsson IM. Commentary to Erik von Willebrand’s original paper from 1926 ‘Hereditär pseudohemofili’. Haemophilia. 1999; 5(3):220-1. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Pemberton’s Sign


DefinitionRaising of the patient’s arms over their head (until the arms touch their face) causes flushing and congestion of head and neck due to venous congestion and thoracic inlet obstruction.

Image result for pemberton sign

Clinical Significance Indicates superior vena cava syndrome in patients with mediastinal mass

History – Ok…so I have conflicting sources on this one:

  1. Dr. Hugh Spear Pemberton (1890-1956) – English physician who first described it in a letter to The Lancet in 1946.
  2. Dr. John de J. Pemberton (1887-1967) – US surgeon who was a pioneer in thyroid surgery

 

You make the call:

Image result for english flag     or     Image result for us flag


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com/. Accessed March 7, 2017.
  5. De Filippis EA, Sabet A, Sun MR, Garber JR. Pemberton’s sign: explained nearly 70 years later. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. 2014;99(6):1949-54. [pubmed]
  6. Pemberton HS.  Sign of submerged goitre.  Lancet.  1946;248(6423):509.