Ep-PAINE-nym



Tullio’s Phenomenon

 

Other Known AliasesSound-induced vestibular activation.

Definition – Vertigo, dizziness, nausea, and nystagmus caused by a load noise.

Clinical Significance This pathology is due to a communication between the middle and inner ear classically associated with congenital syphilis.  Recently, it has been associated with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS).  This can also be elicited with nose-blowing, valsalva, and heavy lifting.

History – Named after Italian biologist Pietro Tullio, Ph.D. (1881-1941), who originally studied this finding in pigeons and published it in 1929. 

Tullio blowing a whistle in the ear of rabbit test subject


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com/
  5. Tullio, Pietro: Das Ohr und die Entstehung der Sprache und Schrift. Berlin, Germany: Urban & Schwarzenberg; 1929.
  6. Kaski D, Davies R, Luxon L, Bronstein AM, Rudge P. The Tullio phenomenon: a neurologically neglected presentation. Journal of Neurology. 2012; 259(1):4-21. [pubmed]
  7. Halmagyi GM, Curthoys IS, Colebatch JG, Aw ST. Vestibular responses to sound. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2005; 1039:54-67. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Argyll Robertson Pupils

 

Other Known Aliases – Prostitute’s Pupil

Definition – Small, bilateral pupils with an absence of miotic reaction to light, both direct and consensual, with preservation of miotic reaction to near stimulus.  In other words, they accommodate, but do not react light (light-near dissociation).

Clinical Significance Classically associated with tabes dorsalis of neurosyphylis, but can also be seen in diabetic neuropathy.  Rare now due to the widespread of antibiotics and treating early syphilis infections

History – Named after Douglas Moray Cooper Lamb Argyll Robertson (1837-1909), who was a Scottish surgeon and ophthalmologist and one of the first to specialize in the eye.  He published his findings of several case reports in two articles in the “Edinburgh Medical Journal” in 1869.  Previous to this however, he was also the first to discover and use the extract of the Calabar bean (otherwise known as physostigmine) for treatment of various eye disorders.

“Dougie”, as his friends called him****


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com/
  5. Robertson DA. On an interesting series of eye symptoms in a case of spinal disease, with remarks on the action of belladonna on the iris. Edinb Med J. 1869;14:696–708.
  6. Robertson DA. Four cases of spinal myosis with remarks on the action of light on the pupil. Edinb Med J. 1869;15:487–493
  7. Robertson, D. A.:  On the Calabar Bean as a New Agent in Ophthalmic Medicine.  Edinb Med J. 1863;93:815-820.

****I have no source for this but he looks like a Dougie….plus with a name like Douglas Moray Cooper Lamb Argyll Robertson, you have to have a nickname, right?

PAINE #PANCE Pearl – Pediatric Edition



Question

 

What are the six (6) classic infectious exanthems of childhood and what organism causes each?

 



Answer

 

The chart below lists the classic exanthems of childhood, the organism that causes, and the “number” disease that were given to them in 1905.

 

It should be noted that Duke’s Disease (fourth disease) is not widely accepted as a true infectious exathem.


References

  1. Bialecki C, Feder HM, Grant-Kels JM. The six classic childhood exanthems: a review and update.. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1989; 21(5 Pt 1):891-903. [pubmed]
  2. Drago F, Ciccarese G, Gasparini G. Contemporary infectious exanthems: an update.. Future Microbiology. 2017; 12:171-193. [pubmed]