Ep-PAINE-nym



Kernig’s Sign

Other Known Aliasesnone

Definitionpain with passive knee extension after placing the hip and knee in flexion

Clinical Significance This maneuver is due to meningeal irritation and inflammation and can be seen in meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and encephalitis. It is one of the two classic physical examination signs for bacterial meningitis, but does not have robust sensitivity nor specificity for the disease. It is now relegated to historical context.

HistoryNamed after Vladimir Mikhailovich Kernig (1840-1917), who was a revered Russian internist and neurologist and received his medical doctorate in 1864 the University of Dorpat. He went on to have a prolific teaching career throughout Russia prior to World War I. He published the description of his eponymous finding in 1882 in an article in the St. Petersberg Medizinische Wochenschrift describing cases of findings from patients with bacterial meningitis.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Mehndiratta M, Nayak R, Garg H, Kumar M, Pandey S. Appraisal of Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s sign in meningitis. Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology. 2012; 15(4):287-8. [pubmed]
  7. Thomas KE, Hasbun R, Jekel J, Quagliarello VJ. The diagnostic accuracy of Kernig’s sign, Brudzinski’s sign, and nuchal rigidity in adults with suspected meningitis. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2002; 35(1):46-52. [pubmed]
  8. Kernig VM (1882). “Ein Krankheitssymptom der acuten Meningitis”. St Petersb Med Wochensch. 7: 398
  9. Ward MA, Greenwood TM, Kumar DR, Mazza JJ, Yale SH. Josef Brudzinski and Vladimir Mikhailovich Kernig: signs for diagnosing meningitis. Clinical medicine & research. 2010; 8(1):13-7. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Brudziński’s Sign

Other Known Aliasesnone

Definitionforced flexion of the neck causes a reflex flexion of the hips

Clinical Significance This maneuver is due to meningeal irritation and inflammation and can be seen in meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and encephalitis. It is one of the two classic physical examination signs for bacterial meningitis, but does not have robust sensitivity nor specificity for the disease. It is now relegated to historical context.

HistoryNamed after Józef Polikarp Brudiński (1874-1917), who was a Polish pediatrician and received his medical doctorate from the University of Moscow in 1897. He practiced at the Anne-Marie children’s hospital in Lodz and was a guiding figure in turning this institution into a model teaching hospital. In 1910, he then was able to design a children’s hospital in Warsaw with financial backing from philanthropist Sophie Szlenker. During this transition period, he also founded the first Polish journal of pediatrics. He best known for his work in pediatric infectious diseases and has his name attributed to several other physical examination findings in meningitis. His most famous was first described and published in 1909 in The Medical Archives for Infants.


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. Mehndiratta M, Nayak R, Garg H, Kumar M, Pandey S. Appraisal of Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s sign in meningitis. Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology. 2012; 15(4):287-8. [pubmed]
  7. Thomas KE, Hasbun R, Jekel J, Quagliarello VJ. The diagnostic accuracy of Kernig’s sign, Brudzinski’s sign, and nuchal rigidity in adults with suspected meningitis. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2002; 35(1):46-52. [pubmed]
  8. J. Brudziñski. Un signe nouveau sur les membres inférieurs dans les méningites chez les enfants (signe de la nuque). Archives de médecine des enfants, Paris 1909, 12: 745-752.

PAINE #PANCE Pearl – Pediatrics



Question

A 3-week old baby girl is sent to your emergency department after being seen by their pediatrician for irritability, poor feeding, and a seizure just prior to arrival at the pediatrician’s office. Vital signs are BP-103/73, HR-137, RR-25, O2-100% on room air, and Temp-39.2oC (102.5oF). Physical examination reveals a lethargic infant with decreased motor tone and a full, bulging frontal fontanelle. What is the most important diagnostic study to obtain and what is the empiric treatment of choice while awaiting results?



Answer

  1. A full or bulging fontenelle is suggestive of meningeal edema and swelling are concerning for meningitis. Couple this with the lethargy and poor motor tone and this infant bought herself a lumbar puncture.
  2. Now….because of her age (<30 days old), you have to cover for a specific set of pathogens due to a developing immune system. Classically, neonatal sepsis bugs include group B streptococcus (GBS), Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes. Empiric antibiotic coverage (until gram stain results) is:
    1. Ampicilin (GBS)
    2. Gentamycin (gram negative coverage)
    3. Cefotaxime (wider gram negative coverage)
2004 – IDSA Guidelines

Ep-PAINE-nym



Roth’s Spots

Other know aliasesLitten’s spots

Definitionexudative, edematous hemorrhagic lesions of the retina with pale, white centers that can be composed of coagulated fibrin, platelets, infectious organisms, or neoplastic cells

Clinical Significanceone of the classic physical examination findings in bacterial endocarditis seen on fundoscopy. Further research and analysis has shown these can be present in leukemia, diabetes, and hypertensive retinopathy

Historynamed after Mortiz Roth (1839-1914), who was a Swiss pathologist and recieved his medical doctorate from University of Basel in 1864. He practiced all around Switzerland before returning to Basel as professor extraordinary of pathology in 1872, when he published his now eponymous findings in an article entitled “Uber Netzhauteffecstionen bei wundfiebren [Retinal Manifestations of wound fever]”. Dr. Roth, though, never described the classic appearance of the retinal red spot with a white center. Dr. Moritz Litten described this finding 6 years later and would coin the term we still use today.


References

  • Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  • Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  • Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  • Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  • Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  • Roth Spots – StatPearls. [article]
  • Roth M. Uber Netzhauteffecstionen bei wundfiebren [Retinal manifestations of wound fever]. Deutsch A Chir. 1872;1:471–84.
  • Litten M. Ueber akute maligne endocarditis
  • und die dabei vorkommenden retinal veranderungen.
  • Charite-Ann 1878;3:135.

PAINE #PANCE Pearl – Infectious Disease



Question

 

To weave a common theme this week between this post and Wednesday’s eponym:

  1. What are the HACEK bugs?
  2. What disease are they associate with?
  3. Why are they important?


Answer

 

The HACEK pathogens is an acronym for the fastidious, gram-negative bacteria that are implicated in 5-10% of infective endocarditis cases. The bugs are:

  • Haemophilus species
  • Aggregatibacter species
  • Cardiobacterium species
  • Eikenella species
  • Kingella species

 

These pathogens are normal oropharyngeal flora, but can take up to 14 days to grow in the laboratory and are often referred to as
culture-negative” endocarditis cases.  It is important to discuss with your lab if you are worried about HACEK pathogens so they can plate the blood cultures on the appropriate agar plates and keep past the typical 3-5 days if there is no growth.

 


References

  1. Sharara SL, Tayyar R, Kanafani ZA, Kanj SS. HACEK endocarditis: a review. Expert review of anti-infective therapy. 2016; 14(6):539-45. [pubmed]
  2. Chambers ST, Murdoch D, Morris A, et al. HACEK infective endocarditis: characteristics and outcomes from a large, multi-national cohort. PloS one. 2013; 8(5):e63181. [pubmed]
  3. Yew HS, Chambers ST, Roberts SA, et al. Association between HACEK bacteraemia and endocarditis. Journal of medical microbiology. 2014; 63(Pt 6):892-5. [pubmed]
  4. Wassef N, Rizkalla E, Shaukat N, Sluka M. HACEK-induced endocarditis. BMJ case reports. 2013; 2013:. [pubmed]

Ep-PAINE-nym



Jones Criteria

 

Other Known Aliasesdiagnostic criteria for acute rheumatic fever

 

Definitionclinical criteria to help diagnose acute rheumatic fever.  There are divided into major and minor criteria as follows:

  • Major
    • Polyarthritis
    • Carditis
    • Subcutaneous nodules
    • Erythema marginatum
    • Sydenham’s chorea
  • Minor
    • Fever
    • Arthralgia
    • Elevated ESR or CRP
    • Leukocytosis
    • 1st degree heart block

Clinical Significancea diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is either two major or one major and two minor criteria

 

History – Named after T. Duckett Jones (1899-1954), an American cardiologist who received his medical doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1923.  With a keen interest in rheumatic fever and heart disease, he practiced at Massachusetts General Hospital and House of Good Samaritan in Boston for over 20 years.  He became the medical director of the Helen Way Whitney Foundation to pursue his passion for public health, which led to one of the first tweleve appointments to the National Advisory Heart Council in 1948.  He published his seminal paper entitled “The Diagnosis of Rheumatic Fever” in JAMA in 1944 which described these findings.  Dr. Jones unfortunately died as a result of malignant hypertension in 1954 at the age of 55.

First page PDF preview

 


References

  1. Firkin BG and Whitwirth JA.  Dictionary of Medical Eponyms. 2nd ed.  New York, NY; Parthenon Publishing Group. 1996.
  2. Bartolucci S, Forbis P.  Stedman’s Medical Eponyms.  2nd ed.  Baltimore, MD; LWW.  2005.
  3. Yee AJ, Pfiffner P. (2012).  Medical Eponyms (Version 1.4.2) [Mobile Application Software].  Retrieved http://itunes.apple.com.
  4. Whonamedit – dictionary of medical eponyms. http://www.whonamedit.com
  5. Up To Date. www.uptodate.com
  6. White PD.  T. Duckett Jones, 1899-1954.  Circulation.  1955.
  7. Shulman ST. T. Duckett Jones and his criteria for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. Pediatric annals. 1999; 28(1):9-12. [pubmed]
  8. Jones TD.  The Diagnosis of Rheumatic Fever.  JAMA. 1944;126(8):481-484 [article]